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Diamond & Diamond, P.A.
NJ FAMILY LAW ATTORNEYS

HIGH-QUALITY REPRESENTATION
IN DIVORCE AND FAMILY LAW
MATTERS

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3 myths about prenups

| Apr 10, 2020 | Family Law |

Prenuptial Agreements

While there is still a stigma surrounding prenuptial agreements, the fact remains that from a practical standpoint, working out a prenup before getting married in New Jersey is a good idea. A prenup is especially wise when one or both marriage partners come to the marriage with significant assets. 

Here are three of the most common myths about prenups, and why every couple planning a wedding should at least discuss one. 

  1. A prenup starts a marriage with the assumption that it will fail

Probably the biggest myth surrounding prenups is that they doom a marriage to end in divorce. According to Business Insider, the vast majority of mental health experts agree that a prenup has “no predictable impact” on whether a marriage will last or not. A prenup does not mean that you mistrust your partner; it means that you care enough about each other to make a plan that benefits both while there are no hurt and possibly angry feelings involved. 

  1. Prenups are ironclad

While you can add anything you want to a prenup, it does not mean that a judge will enforce everything included in the prenup. If the prenup seems too unfair, includes unreasonable expectations or outlines child custody in a way the court does not agree with, a judge can invalidate all or parts of the prenup. 

  1. There is a standard prenup

A prenuptial agreement is just that, an agreement between two people. According to MarketWatch, it can be as individual and tailored as the couple would like. Instead of looking at a prenup as a contract that binds and limits, couples might want to see it as a good way to start the marriage working on financial planning together.